Fibroids1.com: Great Information, Real Community, Better Living.
 Register
 Login
 Main Page
 Fibroids1 News
Feature Story
 Education Center
Conditions
Treatments
Diagnostics

Find a Physician

Dr. Lauren Streicher  Fibroids
 Hero™

Dr. Lauren Streicher:
Educating Patients on their Options
About Heroes 
 Join the Discussion  in  Our Forums
 Community
Fibroids1 Forums
Patient Stories
One Question Poll
    Archive

 Reference

Online Resources
Patient Brochures
Locate a Specialist
Office Visits
Frequently
    Asked Questions

Video Library

  
advertisement
Search the Body1 Network
August 18, 2017  
FIBROIDS1 NEWS: Feature Story

  • Print this Article
  • Email this Article
  • Links/Reprints
  • Link Between Child/Teen Sexual And Physical Abuse And Fibroids In Premenopausal Women


    December 20, 2010

    Source: Boston University Medical Center

    Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have found that both physical and sexual abuse history were positively associated with a higher incidence of uterine fibroids later in life. These findings currently appear on-line in the journal Epidemiology.

    Uterine leiomyomas, also known as fibroids or myomas, are benign, hormone-dependent tumors that are clinically symptomatic in 20 percent of reproductive age women. Fibroids contribute to a third of hysterectomies in the US, increase risk of infertility, spontaneous abortion and pelvic pain and have a significant impact on the quality of life for women. Despite being the most common pelvic neoplasm in women of reproductive age, the etiology of myomas is poorly understood. A growing body of evidence indicates an association between early life social adversities and adult health. Physical, sexual and emotional abuse in childhood has been associated with increased mortality and morbidity in adulthood, and poor health behaviors.

    Participants in this study included 68,505 premenopausal US nurses, enrolled in the Nurses' Health Study II. Sixty-five percent of these women reported physical or sexual abuse as a child or teen.

    The researchers discovered 9,823 incident diagnoses of ultrasound- or hysterectomy confirmed uterine leiomyomas. A dose-response association between cumulative abuse and fibroid risk was found. Risk for fibroids increased from eight to 36 percent among those with the mildest to most severe cumulative abuse in childhood.

    "Our analyses showed that exposure to physical, sexual or emotional abuse in childhood and adolescence was associated with an increased risk for clinically symptomatic fibroid tumors in adulthood. The impact of early life adversity on fibroid risk persisted even among those with no future violence exposure in adulthood," said lead author Renee Boynton Jarrett, MD, ScD, an assistant professor of pediatrics at BUSM.

    In addition, the researchers found having a consistent (very often or always) emotionally supportive relationship in childhood was protective when included as a covariate in the multivariate model of cumulative violence predicting leiomyoma.

    According to Boynton-Jarrett, early life exposure to violence may underpin biologic and behavioral patterns that affect fibroid risk in adulthood. "Childhood abuse may have long-lasting consequences that jeopardize health and well-being not only in childhood, but adulthood as well. We also found that emotionally supportive relationships are protective and in part buffer the negative effects of abuse on fibroid risk in adulthood. Taken together, these findings support the need for future research investigating both the health outcomes associated with child abuse, as well as the factors that may enhance biological resiliency in the face of adversity."

    Funding for this study was provided by the William T. Grant Foundation and the Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women.

    Discuss in the Fibroids1 Forums

    Last updated: 20-Dec-10

    Comments

  • Add Comment
  •    
    Interact on Fibroids1

    Discuss this topic with others.
     
    Feature Archives

    Uterine Fibroids: If in Doubt Always Ask for a Second Opinion

    With Flip of Wrist, Interventional Radiologists Treat Uterine Fibroids

    Fibroids Have Significant Impact on Workplace Performance

    Uterine fibroids have greater impact in African American women

    Should Women with Fibroids have a Hysterectomy?

    Next 5 Features ...

    More Features ...
       
     
    Related Multimedia

    Interview with James Spies, M.D. - Treating and Evaluating Patients with Fibroids

    Interview with James Spies, M.D. - Fibroids: Who should be treated and who should not?

    Interview with James Spies, M.D. - Fibroids, Symptoms and Benefits of the Solution

    More Features ...
     
    Related Content
    Vitamin D May Reduce Risk Of Uterine Fibroids

    Uterine fibroids have greater impact in African American women

    Removing a woman's ovaries during a hysterectomy for noncancerous disease

    Fibroids Have Significant Impact on Workplace Performance

    With Flip of Wrist, Interventional Radiologists Treat Uterine Fibroids

    More Features ...
     
    Home About Us Press Jobs Advertise With Us Contact Us
    advertisement
    © 2017 Body1 All rights reserved.
    Disclaimer: The information provided within this website is for educational purposes only and is not a substitute for consultation with your physician or healthcare provider. The opinions expressed herein are not necessarily those of the Owners and Sponsors of this site. By using this site you agree to indemnify, and hold the Owners and Sponsors harmless, from any disputes arising from content posted here-in.