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September 20, 2017  
COMMUNITY: Frequently Asked Questions

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  • Fibroids1: Do you have any other recommendations for women living with fibroids?
    Dr. Neil Khilnani: I think it's important for women to recognize that there are more treatment options than just hysterectomy, and that most women can find something that will appeal to them and work reasonably well. Women with fibroids who have no symptoms should recognize that they will rarely need any treatment; in most cases, it is reasonable to wait until the fibroids affect the quality of one's life before seeking treatment. Even though many of the minimally-invasive therapies are safer than surgery, all procedures have a finite rate of complication. It is best to avoid all risks if the symptoms are not demanding treatment. All procedures that leave the uterus in place have the potential for fibroid recurrence, and the longer you can hold off on the first fibroid treatment, the less likely you are going to need multiple treatment within the course of your reproductive life. I think many women recognize that the Internet is a great resource to keep abreast of the medical research developments; fibroid embolization became so successful because of the initiative of women to identify what other treatments were available and what would be best for them. Women should continue to be their best advocates.
    Dr. Eunice Moon: A lot of people have fibroids but not everyone needs to be treated. I tell my patients that if they feel like getting treatment solely because they know it's available, then that's not a good enough reason; I can't make patients any better than asymptomatic. I tell them to give me a call back when it's at the point where it is really bothering them. I also have patients who have a high level of anxiety about the procedure. If their symptoms are present but not significant, I tell them we will do a follow-up in six months to see if the fibroids are getting bigger. If they are having more problems at that point then I will treat them. I also try to work with my patients' timelines. Some patients come to see me in March but they don't want any treatment until June because they are teachers and school is let out. We treat a lot of patients in December because their insurance is going to be defunct at the end of the year or they want it done at the holiday season when they have time off work. All those things make sense so we try to be as accommodating as possible. Treatment depends on the patient's level of symptoms and anxiety; she may need the symptoms to get to the point that they overcome her anxiety.
    Dr. Neil Khilnani: I think it's important for women to recognize that there are more treatment options than just hysterectomy, and that most women can find something that will appeal to them and work reasonably well. Women with fibroids who have no symptoms should recognize that they will rarely need any treatment; in most cases, it is reasonable to wait until the fibroids affect the quality of one's life before seeking treatment. Even though many of the minimally-invasive therapies are safer than surgery, all procedures have a finite rate of complication. It is best to avoid all risks if the symptoms are not demanding treatment. All procedures that leave the uterus in place have the potential for fibroid recurrence, and the longer you can hold off on the first fibroid treatment, the less likely you are going to need multiple treatment within the course of your reproductive life. I think many women recognize that the Internet is a great resource to keep abreast of the medical research developments; fibroid embolization became so successful because of the initiative of women to identify what other treatments were available and what would be best for them. Women should continue to be their best advocates.
    Dr. Eunice Moon: A lot of people have fibroids but not everyone needs to be treated. I tell my patients that if they feel like getting treatment solely because they know it's available, then that's not a good enough reason; I can't make patients any better than asymptomatic. I tell them to give me a call back when it's at the point where it is really bothering them. I also have patients who have a high level of anxiety about the procedure. If their symptoms are present but not significant, I tell them we will do a follow-up in six months to see if the fibroids are getting bigger. If they are having more problems at that point then I will treat them. I also try to work with my patients' timelines. Some patients come to see me in March but they don't want any treatment until June because they are teachers and school is let out. We treat a lot of patients in December because their insurance is going to be defunct at the end of the year or they want it done at the holiday season when they have time off work. All those things make sense so we try to be as accommodating as possible. Treatment depends on the patient's level of symptoms and anxiety; she may need the symptoms to get to the point that they overcome her anxiety.

    Dr. Neil Khilnani


    Dr. Khilnani is an Interventional Radiologist at Cornell Vascular and an Associate Professor at the Weill Medical College of Cornell University. He has been with Cornell since finishing his training at Columbia in 1992. His clinical interests are in the minimally invasive treatment of uterine fibroid tumors and lower extremity varicose veins. He currently performs all of the uterine fibroid embolizations at the New York Presbyterian Hospital-Weill Cornell Center and will be directing the clinical and research efforts of this institution in treating fibroids with MR Guided Focused Ultrasound.

    Dr. Eunice Moon

    Dr. Eunice Moon


    Dr. Eunice K. Moon, M.D. has been a full time Interventional Radiologist at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation since 2000. Her areas of expertise include fibroid
    embolization and fallopian tube recannallization. She is also the mother of two young boys, ages 2.5 and 6.

    Dr. Neil Khilnani


    Dr. Khilnani is an Interventional Radiologist at Cornell Vascular and an Associate Professor at the Weill Medical College of Cornell University. He has been with Cornell since finishing his training at Columbia in 1992. His clinical interests are in the minimally invasive treatment of uterine fibroid tumors and lower extremity varicose veins. He currently performs all of the uterine fibroid embolizations at the New York Presbyterian Hospital-Weill Cornell Center and will be directing the clinical and research efforts of this institution in treating fibroids with MR Guided Focused Ultrasound.

    Dr. Eunice Moon

    Dr. Eunice Moon


    Dr. Eunice K. Moon, M.D. has been a full time Interventional Radiologist at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation since 2000. Her areas of expertise include fibroid
    embolization and fallopian tube recannallization. She is also the mother of two young boys, ages 2.5 and 6.

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