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November 18, 2017  
COMMUNITY: Frequently Asked Questions

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  • Fibroids1: Who would be an ideal candidate for embolization?
    Dr. Moises Yoselevitz: Uterine artery embolization is a particularly successful type of intervention for patients that come in with symptoms associated with excessive bleeding or pain and pressure. It used to be that good portion of patients with uterine problems such as fibroids were offered hysterectomies as a treatment. Those patients had to undergo major surgery and sacrifice four to six weeks of their life for recovery. Now when you do a uterine artery embolization, the majority of those patients return to normal activities within a week to 10 days. In addition the outcomes and the relief from symptoms is comparable to surgical intervention. So, interventional radiology relieves those symptoms as successfully as surgery without the extended recovery time.
    Dr. Eunice Moon: The majority of patients are good candidates for this procedure, but a few may not be. A patient with a single polypoid or submucosal fibroid may not be the best candidate. A patient who has a large pedunculated fibroid (growing on a large mushroom-like stalk) may have problems after the procedure. Often, the stalk may fall off and the ball of fibroid tissue may try to pass through the cervix. It can get stuck in the cervix with a potential risk for infection and prolonged discharge. That can be scary for the patient. Sometimes we still do the embolization but there is complete understanding between the patient and myself that should the fibroid fall off the stalk, they may have to have a D and C (dilation and curettage) to remove the residual tissue. We like to cover all of these things ahead of time.
    Dr. Moises Yoselevitz: Uterine artery embolization is a particularly successful type of intervention for patients that come in with symptoms associated with excessive bleeding or pain and pressure. It used to be that good portion of patients with uterine problems such as fibroids were offered hysterectomies as a treatment. Those patients had to undergo major surgery and sacrifice four to six weeks of their life for recovery. Now when you do a uterine artery embolization, the majority of those patients return to normal activities within a week to 10 days. In addition the outcomes and the relief from symptoms is comparable to surgical intervention. So, interventional radiology relieves those symptoms as successfully as surgery without the extended recovery time.
    Dr. Eunice Moon: The majority of patients are good candidates for this procedure, but a few may not be. A patient with a single polypoid or submucosal fibroid may not be the best candidate. A patient who has a large pedunculated fibroid (growing on a large mushroom-like stalk) may have problems after the procedure. Often, the stalk may fall off and the ball of fibroid tissue may try to pass through the cervix. It can get stuck in the cervix with a potential risk for infection and prolonged discharge. That can be scary for the patient. Sometimes we still do the embolization but there is complete understanding between the patient and myself that should the fibroid fall off the stalk, they may have to have a D and C (dilation and curettage) to remove the residual tissue. We like to cover all of these things ahead of time.
    Dr. Moises Yoselevitz

    Dr. Moises Yoselevitz


    Moises Yoselevitz M.D. has served as chief of vascular radiology at the Alton Ochsner Medical Foundation in New Orleans since 1991. Prior to that he was chief of interventional radiology at the Veterans Administration Medical Center in West Haven, Connecticut and an assistant professor of interventional radiology in the department of diagnostic imaging at the Yale University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Eunice Moon

    Dr. Eunice Moon


    Dr. Eunice K. Moon, M.D. has been a full time Interventional Radiologist at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation since 2000. Her areas of expertise include fibroid
    embolization and fallopian tube recannallization. She is also the mother of two young boys, ages 2.5 and 6.

    Dr. Moises Yoselevitz

    Dr. Moises Yoselevitz


    Moises Yoselevitz M.D. has served as chief of vascular radiology at the Alton Ochsner Medical Foundation in New Orleans since 1991. Prior to that he was chief of interventional radiology at the Veterans Administration Medical Center in West Haven, Connecticut and an assistant professor of interventional radiology in the department of diagnostic imaging at the Yale University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Eunice Moon

    Dr. Eunice Moon


    Dr. Eunice K. Moon, M.D. has been a full time Interventional Radiologist at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation since 2000. Her areas of expertise include fibroid
    embolization and fallopian tube recannallization. She is also the mother of two young boys, ages 2.5 and 6.

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